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I don't like the word "Superfood"

Earlier today I removed all references in a guest post to the word "superfood" and replaced it with "useful food" or similar wording.

I made this change because I find that word "Superfood" to be problematic, because it tends to imply that the food is somehow special or magical. While it is true that many foods have special properties or have lots of specific nutrients or minerals, that trait of being useful in some way is pretty much universal of all vegetables, fruits, berries, nuts, etc.

I also find that people in the food industry have a tendency to use the word "superfood" in the same way some people use the words:
  • new, or new and improved
  • exceptional
  • free, or hassle free
  • easy, or very easy
  • perfectly honest
  • results, or get results
  • sex, or sexy
  • love
  • discover
  • guarantee
  • health, or healthier
  • now, or immediately
  • best, or better
  • save, safety or safe
  • proven (Really? By whom?)

These advertising clichéd words are a problem within the food industry because they are being used to sell you on a product - and their usage annoys me and feels dishonest to me. This includes variations on the word like Superfruit or Super-Veggie.

With the word "Superfood" they basically just stuck the word Super on front of the word Food, and then used it as an advertising word to try and sell people on the concept that the food they are promoting is somehow special.

When you go to Wikipedia and look up superfood, here is the first paragraph:

Superfood is a marketing term used to describe foods with supposed health benefits.[1][2] The term is not in common use by dietitians and nutrition scientists, many of whom dispute that particular foods have the health benefits often claimed by their advocates. Catherine Collins, for instance, the chief dietitian at St George's Hospital in London has stated that "[t]he term 'superfoods' is at best meaningless and at worst harmful... There are so many wrong ideas about superfoods that I don't know where best to begin to dismantle the whole concept."[3]

 So clearly I am not alone in my assertion that the word Superfood is possibly harmful to the people who are tricked into thinking that various foods are "magically special".

I fully recommend reading the full Wiki entry on the topic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superfood

Use of the word Superfood is also ever expanding. It is theoretically possible for people to use it to describe junk food.

"Look at our new high sodium potato chips! It is a superfood chockful of sodium and electrolytes! Great for replenishing after you exercise!"

See my point? All potato chips are high in sodium and potassium - which are technically useful to replenish sodium and potassium.

But do you actually need to replenish if you are done exercising? No. You don't. Your body will naturally replenish those things over time through your regular diet. Bananas and potatoes are both high in potassium. If you really needed more potassium, you could get it from a baked potato, banana, plantains, or various other foods.

A common example of a "superfood" used by the food industry is blueberries, despite being very average when compared to various other foods. So while blueberries are good for you, don't believe everything you read about their greatness.

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