Sign up for personal training / sports training by emailing cardiotrek@gmail.com.

Strange and Weird Archery Stabilizers

Lots of weird archery stabilizers out there on the market. Lets look at a few for fun.


The NAP Apache Stabilizer

  • Despite its weird design, this stabilizer boasts 4.5 star reviews on Amazon, and ranks as one of the best stabilizers on the market.
  • Comes in black or camo. Or course it is does. It would be weird if it did NOT come in camouflage.
  • Note - I own an older and shorter version of the one shown above that is on one of my compound bows. I bought it because, at the time, the Apache Stabilizer had the best reviews on the market, and because I liked its weird shape. These days I usually use a Trophy Ridge stabilizer instead which has even better reviews (4.9), but looks boring in comparison.



The Axion Stabilizer / Carrying Handle

  • This 2-in-1 model looks weird because it is both a lower center of gravity stabilizer, and it acts as a handle for carrying of your compound bow. (As if the regular handle wasn't enough of a handle.)
  • Bonus - It is very short, making it easier to get around foliage.


The Beestinger Pro Hunter MAXX

  • It has two Xs in its name. You know, to be different from all the other companies which stick XX or XXX in its name.
  • It looks like a toilet plunger.
  • Nothing says "weirdo" like the guy walking around with a toilet plunger stuck to his bow.
  • The brand typically has 4 or 4.5 star reviews, despite most of their stabilizers looking like they were designed to unplug a plugged toilet.
  • The design is an attempt to add more weight to the end of the stabilizer to maximize the shift in the center of gravity for the bow.


The Trophy Taker Quiver Stabilizer

  • Oh look, another 2-in-1 stabilizer. Like that hasn't been done before.
  • They stuck the arrows on the left side... For a right handed shooter the arrows should be on the right side so they can reach it easier.
  • How is the weight going to be evenly balanced? Especially since the balance of weight will change each time you (awkwardly) remove an arrow from the quiver.
  • The company "Option Archery" makes a near identical quiver stabilizer they call the "Quivalizer". Proof that more than one company thought this was a great idea.


The Golf Club Stabilizer

  • Just kidding. Not a real stabilizer.
  • Allows you to play golf while you hunt. Yeah...?

And somewhat off topic...

I came across the "Shoot Tech Systems Raptor Advance" compound bow while researching weird stabilizers. It looks like it belongs in a futuristic sci fi movie. Also, in keeping with the 2-in-1 idiocy, this bow also doubles as a slingshot... Because clearly what sci fi movie doesn't need a person carrying a giant and impractical slingshot that looks like it was designed by someone in the Aliens franchise. #Insanity!




Looking for archery lessons in Toronto? Cardio Trek offers weekday and weekend archery lessons.

Archery Competition Rescheduled to July 29th

So the archery competition that was supposed to be on June 23rd got rained out. And on the 24th (the rainday replacement day) it also rained plus thunderstorms. So that whole weekend was rescheduled for July.

So the new date for the competition is Sunday July 29th 2018.

Here are some details:

Registration starts at 10:00 AM and cuts off at 11:00 AM no exceptions.

Location:

The Toronto Archery Range located at E. T. Seton Park.

Free admission to enter. Prizes.

Three categories:
  • Olympic Recurve
  • Compound
  • Barebow (Traditional Recurve, Longbow, etc)

New Rain Date: Saturday, July 28th. The people organizing the competition will decide on Friday whether the weather looks good for Sunday or not, and whether Saturday is the better option.

For those people not competing come anyway for the Raffle, Potluck BBQ and general fun times.

Personal Note

I will be judging / adjudicating this competition. Which mostly means I will be explaining rules to people, doing math, and checking to see if an arrow is touching a line or not.

A Lesson in Adaptive Archery, Archery Focus Magazine


My 2nd article for Archery Focus Magazine has been published in the July 2018 issue. Titled "A Lesson in Adaptive Archery".

The article is about my first experience coaching a very brave student with no fingers. Not many coaches will take on the challenge of teaching students with a disability, but for its challenges it is also a rewarding experience.

Adaptive Archery is the term used for teaching people who have disabilities when it comes to doing archery and have to adapt their methodology so that they can still shoot (and even compete) in the sport.

There is a whole industry of products available for people with various problems to overcome, so for every disability there is usually one or more items available for the Adaptive Archer to use to beat the problem they are facing.

Some people also make their own solutions and/or adaptive equipment. It really comes down to problem solving.

So in my case as the student's coach I needed to do some problem solving so that a student with no fingers would be able to hold the bow, and also to be able to draw the bowstring.

And if you want to read about how we solved this problem, you will need to buy a copy of the magazine. I am not going to spill the beans here.

Subscriptions to Archery Focus Magazine are available by visiting archeryfocusmagazine.com. You can even use the following discount code to get 20% off your subscription: 20afm2018.



You may have noticed I said this was my 2nd article to be published in Archery Focus Magazine.

My first article was about how to market/advertise an archery coaching business, and titled "Marketing Strategies for Archery Coaches" and was published in the July 2017 issue.


So clearly I need to keep up a tradition and publish another one in July 2019. I have no idea what the topic will be...

Maybe something about teaching my son archery? He is barely over 1 now, so by March 2019 I might be showing him how to shoot already. Maybe. Maybe not. Some toddlers even compete in archery competitions for the under 3 category, but I don't think I want to push Richard into archery. It should be something he sees and wants to do. I don't want him to feel pressured he has to do it.

Who knows? We shall have to see.

Last year I also set myself a goal of publishing articles in multiple archery magazines.
  • Traditional Bowhunter Magazine
  • TradArcher's World Magazine
  • Bowhunting World Magazine
  • Petersen's Bowhunting Magazine
And just because it is a local magazine found here in Ontario:
  • Ontario Out of Doors (OOD) Magazine

Also if you noticed, Simon Needham and Steve Ruis seem to have their own July tradition. Writing and publishing "Getting to 600" and "Getting to 650" one year apart.

So clearly some archers really like their traditions. Especially Traditional Archers. 😉

Is it too much to ask clients to remember the day of their lesson?

So imagine you are a personal trainer or some kind of sports trainer (eg. swimming instructor) and clients book specific days and times for their training session. This describes me and my business, as I am both a personal trainer and a sports instructor.

And lets imagine you teach certain sports and activities outdoors, even when it is one of the hottest days of the year. Like it was Saturday with the combined temperature and humidity putting Toronto in a bake you until you die 46 degrees Celsius. So crazy hot.

So you are there in the baking heat, so hot that a friend of yours sticks unbaked cookies inside their car on the dashboard and comes back later and their cookies are baked (and their car smells like freshly baked cookies now). True story.

So you are out there in the heat and you notice your client / student is running late. You check your email and see the following:

"I am so sorry for the last minute.
I am just getting back from Prague..
an I thought this was tomorrow."

And you should be rightfully annoyed. I know I was.

At 7:30 AM that morning I sent them an email warning them about the heat that day. Recommending they bring cold drinks with them.

Did they really get back from Prague? Who knows. Maybe.

Or maybe they just realized it was going to be super hot outside and wanted to reschedule based on the weather conditions. That is normal. Would not be the first time we have rescheduled because of rain, thunderstorms, too hot, too windy, snowing, blizzard, too cold, etc. Except weather was not their excuse. Their excuse was they thought the lesson was Sunday, even though they scheduled it for Saturday.

Not even showing up however and/or last minute cancellations... those are a personal pet peeve for me.

There is a reason why dentists charge patients if you forget your dentist appointment and don't show up. They were there. Their staff was there. Everything ready for the patient to arrive. And then they don't show up. The staff and everyone still needs to get paid, even if the patient forgets they had a dental appointment.

Same goes for me. I am out there in the weather, sometimes very hot weather, with all my equipment ready to go, and if a student / client doesn't show up for their lesson...

Well then that is just a clear forfeiture.

Because I was there. Where was the student?

Relaxing after getting back from Prague supposedly.

Years ago I ended up making a Terms of Service page to remind people what happens when they miss lessons or want to reschedule lessons. Rescheduling a lesson? No problem, I just need 24 hours notice so I don't end up outside in the heat or cold waiting for a student who decided last minute to not show up. Missing a lesson because you forgot? That is a forfeiture.

I am also not your Social Secretary. It is not my job to remind clients of when their lessons are. It is the client's job to remember to show up, just like it is my job to be there on time, ready to instruct.

Not knowing or remembering the day of the lesson (if that was truly the case) is clearly the fault of the client. After all, I am not their Social Secretary. It is not my job to remind them what days and times they have lessons on.

Is it too much to ask clients to remember the day of their lesson?

So after receiving the email I was annoyed. And overheating in the heat/humidity, and being in such a state is never good time to answer emails from people who have annoyed you.

I ended up waiting 24 hours before replying and politely explaining that they had forfeited the lessons because they had failed to give me 24 hour notice. Politely. Like a true Canadian would.

I have also noticed that some clients in the past are "problem clients". The type of people who reschedule lessons frequently, show up late, forget they have lessons, and even make up funny excuses. One such "problem client" years ago claimed she had somehow misplaced her children after a series of similar times when she had failed to show up for lessons on time or at all. She did it so often she ended up forfeiting all of her lessons by supposedly getting lost, claiming to be stuck in traffic for two hours, forgetting what day the lesson was, and finally the "I misplaced my children" excuse.

I eventually Googled her name and discovered she had been fired from her workplace for a serious case of office politics coupled with being accused of fraud. So her reputation was that of a person not to be trusted, and myself and others should probably avoid having any dealings with such an untrustworthy person who clearly makes up excuses and lies all the time.

So what should a person do with problem clients?

  1. Fulfill any remaining obligations.
  2. Issue a refund or partial refund if absolutely necessary.
  3. Once 1 and 2 have been accomplished, stop answering their emails.

I once had a client whom I was teaching his son archery, and he basically treated me like a babysitter - which I am not. His son also had behavioural issues which made him unsafe to be teaching a sport like archery. Somehow (long story) I gained the impression that the client was in the mafia and was not used to being told "no". So when he asked for more archery lessons for his son, after his lessons had been exhausted and my obligations had been met, I asked him to send me an email regarding booking more lessons. I then simply never replied to his email. I also later changed my policy regarding minimum age for archery lessons to 16.

So there are more than one way for a client to be considered to be a "problem client" in my opinion. Chronic lateness/not showing up at all is certainly one way. Me becoming worried that the client is a criminal (or hires other people to commit crimes) is certainly another way. Treating me like a babysitter or having a spoiled kid who is a safety hazard, that is also another way.

Most of My Clients are Wonderful

99.7% of my clients show up on time. Or if they are running late, they let me know via text message or email.

They are a joy to teach. They don't make up lies or excuses either.

It is really the few bad eggs out of thousands of clients I have taught over the page 9 years that cause me headaches. I don't lose sleep over these people. I just point to the Terms of Service so they know what happens when they miss lessons and the proper way to reschedule a lesson.

Or at least, the proper way to lie about it. People who are sick or severely injured get a free ride when it comes to rescheduling lessons. Here is how to lie about it:

Contact me BEFORE the lesson begins and just say you are sick and unable to make it. Contacting me after the lesson has begun (or was supposed to have begun), well that still counts as a forfeiture, because you knew you were sick or injured hours before the lesson and there is no reason not to have let me know as soon as possible.

If the lesson start time comes and a client is clearly late I typically contact them after 10-15 minutes with a polite "Running late?" If they then say they are sick, that is unfortunately a forfeiture because they failed to notify me of their illness BEFORE the lesson time began.

Jetlag is not an adequate excuse because the person knew they would have jetlag when they returned from a trip, and it is neither an illness or an injury. There is no reason they should not have been able to email me 24 hours before the lesson and let me know they want to reschedule.

If a client is going to lie and make up an excuse, at least say you are sick. And do try to let me know before the lesson start time. Preferably before 8:30 AM, but definitely before the scheduled time slot.



Happy Canada Day!

On Sunday the wife, son, and I visited my mother-in-law for Canada Day. I never book archery lessons that day (or other holidays) because people have a tendency to reschedule anyway.

Monday (a holiday thanks to Canada Day being on a weekend this year) we went to the beach and it was so crazy hot we got slushies en route to the beach. Slushies are not very healthy, but I said to the wife:

"I would rather have brain-freeze than have heatstroke."


And to paraphrase myself on this true topic of this post:

"I would rather have clients who show up on time and remember their lessons than to have clients who do not."


5 Easy Ways to Stay Active at Work

Guest Post by Cara Benson.

Wellness in the workplace is becoming a trending topic of discussion due to the advancement of research regarding the health risks of sitting all day. Sitting behind a computer screen all day is becoming the modern work-style within most businesses. Sadly, most desk workers are oblivious to the fact that sitting in an office all day can lead to some pretty serious health problems.

To avoid experiencing any sort of desk induced health issue, it is important that we motivate ourselves to move around more often during the day. Doing so will not only improve our overall health, but it can stimulate motivation in others to do so as well. Are you looking for some ways to remain active in your workplace? Check out these ideas:

#1. Stand Up and Stretch

When your muscles and ligaments aren’t moving enough, cramping, aches and sharp pains can occur in different areas of the body. In addition to an improvement in flexibility and better posture, stretching helps the body release tension that is built up from remaining stationary for too long. Taking frequent breaks from your desk to stand and stretch is a simple way to avoid such health problems and to make your work day a less painful one. Check out Cardio Trek's section on stretching where you can find some other great benefits and tips of stretching everyday!

#2. Walk or Bike to Work

Depending on the location of your workplace, walking or riding a bike to work are great options to fit in exercise before starting your day. Walking or biking might already be part of your transportation method on your arrival to work, but if not, park slightly further away from your job site to walk a block beforehand. If walking to work is part of your daily schedule, try extending your commute by strolling an extra block or two. That way, you’re entering your office feeling revitalized and ready to conquer the day! If walking or biking to work isn’t something you think will stick in your itinerary, try finding time during your lunch break for a brisk walk!


#3. Schedule a Group Fitness Event

Remember, as you’re sitting at your desk all day and feeling sluggish, most likely, some of your coworkers are as well. Spread motivation throughout your workplace by scheduling a group fitness event! By using an online event planning platform (eg. Meetup, Facebook or Eventbrite via https://www.eventbrite.com/l/registration-online/), you can establish a time and location for the fitness event, and track your RSVPs with the benefit of staying organized!

Sample Activities you can do with your coworkers on weekends or during the evenings after work:

  1. Archery Lessons (for up to 3 people).
  2. Boxing Lessons or Beach Volleyball.
  3. Cycling Outdoors. Or possibly Spin Class.
  4. Dance Lessons.
  5. Fencing Club. Or even Fishing (most of the exercise is carrying fishing equipment).
  6. Golf or Mini Golf.
  7. Hiking.
  8. Ice Skating.
  9. Jogging.
  10. Kayaking - Because who doesn't want to at least try kayaking?
  11. Laser Tag.
  12. Martial Arts Lessons or Mountain Biking.
  13. Nine Pin Bowling.
  14. Obstacle Course Races.
  15. Pokemon Go, the game is still surprisingly popular and great exercise.
  16. Rock Climbing.
  17. Swimming.
  18. Tennis. Or even various Team Sports.
  19. Volleyball.
  20. Water Polo.
  21. Yoga Classes - The more the merrier.
  22. Zumba Classes.

#4. Take the Stairs

An elevator is an easy ride, and requires a very low level of activity. Usually, individuals take the stairs when the elevator is broken or if it’s the only option to get one floor to the next. Using the stairs everyday can improve heart health, increase activeness, and actually save you time (according to Reuters the stairs are often faster than the elevator). If you have the option to take the stairs in your workplace, do so to get in as many steps as possible, especially if you work at a desk.

#5. Take Frequent Walks Around the Office

Being stagnant all day is the definition of an unhealthy lifestyle. It is extremely important to make a constant effort to remove yourself from your desk chair to get your legs moving. Without motion, you are more prone to the health risks that come with sitting at a desk all day, such as blood clots, fatigue, and chronic pain. Along with the fitness related advantages, taking walks around the office is like pushing a mentality reset button, and can change your negative mindset to a motivated one!

Let’s reduce the amount of sitting at our desks all day by motivating ourselves and other desk workers to pursue a more active lifestyle!
Looking to sign up for archery lessons, boxing lessons, swimming lessons, ice skating lessons or personal training sessions? Start by emailing cardiotrek@gmail.com and lets talk fitness!

Subscribe by Email

Followers

Popular Posts

Cardio Trek Posts